Solstice Shorts: Longest Night, the Midwinter Wife


The  Midwinter Wife got another outing at Longest Night. Here is the peerless Annalie Wilson reading the shorter performance version

You can buy the full length print version in Latchkey Tales Clockwise – Midnight Blues

Cutting a Long Story Short


NAWE’s new website ‘Cut a Long Story‘ is finally live, and you can or will soon be able to find several of my stories on there to buy as single story ebooks. The fastest way to find my stuff is via my profile page. I’ve only got one story up at the moment, but I have loaded some others from Tales told before Cockcrow, which would otherwise be out of print, and should be live within a fortnight.

I’ve spotted some Arachne Press friends authors and poets, on there too, it’s early days but there are some interesting stories to be had.

What is slowing me up is the need for a really good image to go with the story – that I have permission to use. I’ve used my own photographs (some manipulated) for the one’s I’ve loaded but I’m a bit stuck. Any arty folk out there want to help out? All that’s on offer is gratitude and a credit! I need an illustration for The Knight Who Didn’t, and Tante Rouge in particular, and possible Glory, or Hope You can find extracts from these here. Get in touch if you are interested in coming up with a ‘cover’ image for any of them!

 

 

LonCon 3 – Suggestions?


So I’m on a couple of panels for LonCon 3, and I need to do some homework so that I’m properly on the ball. Suggested (re)reading (and viewing I suppose) please, from all you SF fans out there.

First one:

WE CAN REBUILD YOU. SF medicine regularly comes up with “cures” for disabled bodies — from Geordi LaForge’s visor to the transfer of Jake Sully’s consciousness in Avatar — but the implications of such interventions are not always thought through as fully as we might hope. How does a rhetoric of medical breakthroughs and scientific progress shape these stories, and shape SF’s representation of lived physical difference? In what ways can SF narratives address dis/ability without either minimising or exaggerating such difference?

My immediate thought is Anne McCaffery’s The Ship Who Sang and from the film world Gattaca, but can anyone suggest any other SF where future-science plays a major part in coping with, or celebrating disability? I can think of piles of fantasy, but not so much SF. Obscure short stories maybe? Oh, something just surfaced in the old brain there – Vonda McKintyre – must find… Suggestions (of things you have actually read or seen yourself, please) in the comments please!

Panel number 2:

Liechester Square: Getting London Wrong

If there’s one thing you can guarantee about the reaction to any piece of SF set in London, it’s that British fans will delight in nit-picking the details: you can’t get there on the Piccadilly Line! So who are the worst offenders? Whose commodified Londons do we forgive for the sake of other virtues in their writing? Do we complain as much about cultural errors as geographic ones, and if not, why not? And given London’s status as a global city, is it even fair to claim ownership of its literary representation?

Suggested reading /viewing on this one? (Cliff – any particular episodes of Dr Who?)

I’m thinking Day of the Triffids, Quatermass, Rivers of London, Un Lun Dun, Veronica Britton, the dreadful (but London set) Avengers movie. There’s something by Diana Wynne Jones (I think) tugging at my memory too.

I don’t want to read or watch the entire enormous oeuvre of London Sci Fi, but any suggestions for particularly well-handled London, or particularly badly imagined London? Anything that makes you cry out as Lyra does, of Oxford, in The Subtle Knife:
That’s not my London!

Comments invited!

Catch ‘Joining’ on ‘Litro’


Anyway, my story Joining (recently performed in a slightly different version at Towersey Festival) was a runner-up in Litro magazine’s cults and clubs competition, you can read it here.

It’s been a month for getting mentioned on other people’s websites, and you can also read my guest blog about publishing short stories on BooksEtc.

and my guest blog for National Short Story Week (Coming up in November)

The Queen’s Safety


My story The Queen’s Safety was read at Liars’ League last week.

For those of you not in the audience, you can read, listen or watch the story (performed by Greg Page) on the Liars’ League site soon, but in the meantime, the video is on YouTube.

One Grey Eye


I’ve just had a story accepted for One Grey Eye, an electronic ‘Penny Dreadful’ available on  Kindle. My story, Eye of the Beholder will be available around Halloween in Stories From Another London along with other excellent stories to unsettle you good and proper!

Here’s a snippet to whet your appetite:

Eye of the Beholder

A wedding picture – mum sitting, holding Dad’s hand by the fingertips, a gooey look on her face that seemed completely implausible, given what he knew of their relationship.  Carefully posed that, to hide the bump under the short, plain, white cotton dress.  They got married in early November, and Bill’s birthday, today, he reflected grimly, casting a glance at a silent mobile phone, was in early February.  She must have been freezing, he thought, not for the first time, and marvelling at the back-combed glory of his mother’s hair.  Which once more reminded him of the girl by the cemetery.

He frowned and pulled out two almost identical baby pictures, himself a few days old, cradled in his father’s astonished arms.  A cigarette dangled from dad’s fingers inches from his infant head: amazing he hadn’t set light to the blanket.

© Cherry Potts 2012

A Second Hand Emotion, read by Gill Stoker


A recording of the lovely Gill Stoker reading (and singing – brave woman!) my story A Second Hand Emotion at Tall Tales at the Tavern, an event I co-curated with Bartle Sawbridge back in June.

a second hand emotion by cherry potts, read by gill stoker

© Cherry Potts 2012

Last chance to book Myth and Music


WRITING WITH YOUR EARS: Myth and Music will be cancelled if there are not enough takers.  if you were thinking of coming please book asap!

Explore the enduring power of fairy tale as part of the Blackheath Community Opera experience, join local author (and opera chorus member) Cherry Potts for an opportunity to write your own fairy tale while listening to the music of Massenet’s Cendrillon (Cinderella) during an orchestra rehearsal. You don’t need to be involved in the opera in any other way to sign up for this workshop. Discover the power of music (particularly live music) to inspire plot, atmosphere and character development, explore the variations and patterns of a traditional tale and the influence of myth and legend, fairy/folk tales. Sunday 17th June 2.30-5.30 (This is a NEW date please take note, not 24th as originally advertised) Blackheath Halls 23 Lee Road London SE3 9RQ