Brockley Max – urban myths


Here’s a recording of me reading Algorithms, written specifically for the Urban Myths event at Brockley Max last night, which showcased the work of my fellow WooA writers.

Still recovering from an epic evening of communal writing!

Catch my writing LIVE


I had a spurt of doing submissions recently, and happily can now announce that my story Greenlanders is being read at Liars’ League on Tuesday 14th June – a transport themed evening in which I take up the baton for whaling ships and emigrant steamers. I can’t be there as I’m teaching in another part of town, and even the fastest bus on earth isn’t going to get me there in time, so if any friends, relations or enthusiasts want to go along and cheer vigorously, that would be gratifying!

I wrote the story as part of a workshop I was running at the Metropolitan Archive, writing to live music from Sarah Lloyd & Ian Kennedy, and having just looked at an exhibition of Victorian photographs of everyone from celebrities to ne’er-do-wells.

Another chance to catch a live story, this time in Bath, at Story Friday on 17th June – a busy week! The story is Midsummer Morris Marathon, fo their Solstice theme. This time I’m reading it myself, so the encouragement to friends in the area is even more forceful – you will be hearing from me!

This story is based on elements of fact – I have met those inexhaustible dancers, though not in Somerset, I have stood on that hill and seen that view – after that it’s entirely hokum, unless it isn’t of course…

morris12

Solstice Shorts: Longest Night, the Midwinter Wife


The  Midwinter Wife got another outing at Longest Night. Here is the peerless Annalie Wilson reading the shorter performance version

You can buy the full length print version in Latchkey Tales Clockwise – Midnight Blues

Cutting a Long Story Short


NAWE’s new website ‘Cut a Long Story‘ is finally live, and you can or will soon be able to find several of my stories on there to buy as single story ebooks. The fastest way to find my stuff is via my profile page. I’ve only got one story up at the moment, but I have loaded some others from Tales told before Cockcrow, which would otherwise be out of print, and should be live within a fortnight.

I’ve spotted some Arachne Press friends authors and poets, on there too, it’s early days but there are some interesting stories to be had.

What is slowing me up is the need for a really good image to go with the story – that I have permission to use. I’ve used my own photographs (some manipulated) for the one’s I’ve loaded but I’m a bit stuck. Any arty folk out there want to help out? All that’s on offer is gratitude and a credit! I need an illustration for The Knight Who Didn’t, and Tante Rouge in particular, and possible Glory, or Hope You can find extracts from these here. Get in touch if you are interested in coming up with a ‘cover’ image for any of them!

 

 

LonCon 3 – Suggestions?


So I’m on a couple of panels for LonCon 3, and I need to do some homework so that I’m properly on the ball. Suggested (re)reading (and viewing I suppose) please, from all you SF fans out there.

First one:

WE CAN REBUILD YOU. SF medicine regularly comes up with “cures” for disabled bodies — from Geordi LaForge’s visor to the transfer of Jake Sully’s consciousness in Avatar — but the implications of such interventions are not always thought through as fully as we might hope. How does a rhetoric of medical breakthroughs and scientific progress shape these stories, and shape SF’s representation of lived physical difference? In what ways can SF narratives address dis/ability without either minimising or exaggerating such difference?

My immediate thought is Anne McCaffery’s The Ship Who Sang and from the film world Gattaca, but can anyone suggest any other SF where future-science plays a major part in coping with, or celebrating disability? I can think of piles of fantasy, but not so much SF. Obscure short stories maybe? Oh, something just surfaced in the old brain there – Vonda McKintyre – must find… Suggestions (of things you have actually read or seen yourself, please) in the comments please!

Panel number 2:

Liechester Square: Getting London Wrong

If there’s one thing you can guarantee about the reaction to any piece of SF set in London, it’s that British fans will delight in nit-picking the details: you can’t get there on the Piccadilly Line! So who are the worst offenders? Whose commodified Londons do we forgive for the sake of other virtues in their writing? Do we complain as much about cultural errors as geographic ones, and if not, why not? And given London’s status as a global city, is it even fair to claim ownership of its literary representation?

Suggested reading /viewing on this one? (Cliff – any particular episodes of Dr Who?)

I’m thinking Day of the Triffids, Quatermass, Rivers of London, Un Lun Dun, Veronica Britton, the dreadful (but London set) Avengers movie. There’s something by Diana Wynne Jones (I think) tugging at my memory too.

I don’t want to read or watch the entire enormous oeuvre of London Sci Fi, but any suggestions for particularly well-handled London, or particularly badly imagined London? Anything that makes you cry out as Lyra does, of Oxford, in The Subtle Knife:
That’s not my London!

Comments invited!

Catch ‘Joining’ on ‘Litro’


Anyway, my story Joining (recently performed in a slightly different version at Towersey Festival) was a runner-up in Litro magazine’s cults and clubs competition, you can read it here.

It’s been a month for getting mentioned on other people’s websites, and you can also read my guest blog about publishing short stories on BooksEtc.

and my guest blog for National Short Story Week (Coming up in November)