Tall Tales at the Tavern


Tall Tales at the Tavern

three women reading a book togetherJoin WOOA Brockley Writers’ Group for an evening of stories by local writers:

Bartle Sawbridge, Cherry Potts, Clare Sandling,

David Bausor, Joan Taylor Rowan, Rosalind Stopps

Read by Gill Stoker and Mike Burnside

Followed by a flash fiction open mic session for any other writers who want to join in, around 200 words: bring something along, or write in the interval.

Misty Moon Gallery, Ladywell Tavern, 80 Ladywell Road, SE13 7HS

Thursday 7th June 2012 7.00pm

No booking required, just turn up and grab a seat

Food for Thought


Writing Workshop and Writers’ Lunch

At the Swindon Festival of Literature

Lower Shaw Farm West Swindon Wiltshire SN5 5PJ
Tel 01793 771080
12.30pm – 5pm 19 May • £25

12.30pm – 1.30pm WRITERS’ LUNCH

where healthy homemade food will nourish you and meeting other writers at table may inspire you!

1.30pm – 5pm WRITING WORKSHOP: Sugar and Spice and Food for Thought with Cherry Potts

Writing is a solitary business. Writing well is a tricky one. Writing well for others is even harder. How can we do it better?

Explore the possibilities that come from using more of your senses when you write. Discover ways of writing what you really want to say to your readers.

You will be in good company, and if you have any questions, you can ask them, and reckon to receive good answers. If you are serious about writing, then this is a workshop for you. It will inspire, inform, and help you, even to have fun.

Cherry Potts is a mentor, coach, and the author of Mosaic of Air and Tales Told Before Cockcrow, and runs a fledgling publishing business, Arachne Press.

This will be based on the workshop I ran as part of the Streatham Food Festival, Sugar and Spice, and will draw in a few tasters from other senses to explore ways of spicing up your writing. (Puns strictly optional, especially bad ones).

Why Short Stories?


There’s been a lot of chat going on recently about short stories, including on the radio, this week’s Open Book had  Aminatta Forna giving a potted history of the short story from Poe, Chekhov and Saki to Helen Simpson, and even Ramblings (a walking programme … fascinating, listen!) had Claire Balding in company with short story writer Anna Maria Murphy. (nothing like being stuck at home recovering, for catching up with the radio in between sleeping.)

Having written two collections of short stories myself (and with enough material for 2 more!) and planning to publish (I hope) at least 6 anthologies over the next year or two, you’ll have gathered I’m quite keen!

I had an email yesterday in response to my posting about London Lies, in which the writer says

I was sure that it was near impossible to get short story collections published unless you are a well-known author

and asking how I managed it.

My very first short story was published in an anthology over 20 years ago. It was called Penelope Is No Longer Waiting, and I had sent it to Rosemary Manning, who was a friend, to cheer her up when she was unwell.  I got a phone call a couple of days later, saying

you could publish this

and then I saw a call for submissions from Onlywomen Press, and sent it off, and was accepted.  That easy.  I can still remember opening that letter, so thrilling.

I had two more stories in a further anthology at OWP, and then having got quite friendly with Lilian Mohin, the director at OWP, she was complaining about the quality of a lot of the submissions she received, and how she wished everyone wrote as well as me (or words to that effect).  My response was

plenty more where that came from

and I started drip-feeding her stories, one a month, under the heading of ‘entertaining Ms Mohin’, until she gave in and offered to publish a collection.  That was Mosaic of Air.

Mosaic didn’t sell very well, partly because I was in a wallflower phase and wouldn’t do any publicity, (I am so over that, as you may have noticed) and ended up with the remaining stock being pulped.  Not a happy moment!

Life rather caught up with me then and I wrote almost nothing for 11 years, then pulled myself together and published another collection, Tales Told Before Cockcrow. This did much better than Mosaic, and has almost sold out.

But what is it about the short story?

I’ll admit that some of my ‘short’ work is very long, almost novella length (now that’s really difficult to publish) but there’s something about a short story that’s like a jewel: carefully faceted and burnished to perfection, not a word wasted nor out of place.

Novels often have slow passages or subplots that don’t quite come off, but you are in it for the long haul so you put up with it, whereas you can’t afford to drift in a short story; and you can take risks and play games with language and structure, and the reader is prepared to come along because they know it’s not going to take you long to reach the punchline.

Since joining a writing group (WOOA) I’ve discovered that with a defined set of limitations I can write a fully formed story with a beginning middle and end in 20 minutes flat. Short Short stories… not quite flash fiction, because if it’s working, I write fast.

A really good short story settles into your mind with a sigh of satisfaction, like a good malt, or a perfectly toasted and buttered crumpet.

© Cherry Potts 2012

Judging a Book By Its Cover


Teresa Villegras' magnificent painting

Joan Taylor-Rowan talks about choosing the right cover for her novel, The Birdskin Shoes, and discovering the work of artist Teresa Villegras

joan taylor-rowan clip 6 book cover

© Cherry Potts 2012